Organizational Learning Culture, Innovative Culture and Innovations in South Korean Firms

Together with my two South Korean coleagues we have just published on-line a new journal article in Expert Systems with Applications, which is a No.1 cited journal in the SSCI category of Management science and operations research in the year 2009:

Škerlavaj, M., Song, J.H., Lee, Y. (In Press): Organizational Learning Culture, Innovative Culture and Innovations in South Korean Firms. Expert Systems with Applications, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eswa.2010.02.080

Here is the abstract:

The aim of this paper is to present and test a model of innovativeness improvement based on the impact of organizational learning culture. The concept of organizational learning culture (OLC) is presented and defined as a set of norms and values about the functioning of an organization. They should support systematic, in-depth approaches aimed at achieving higher-level organizational learning. The elements of an organizational learning process that we use are information acquisition, information interpretation, and behavioral and cognitive changes. Within the competing values framework OLC covers some aspects of all four different types of cultures: group, developmental, hierarchical, and rational. Constructs comprising innovativeness are innovative culture and innovations, which are made of technical (product and service) and administrative (process) innovations. We use data from 201 Korean companies employing more than 50 people. The impact of OLC on innovations empirically tested via structural equation modeling (SEM). The results show that OLC has a very strong positive direct effect on innovations as well as moderate positive indirect impact via innovative culture.

Expert Systems with Applications. Journal Citation Report, Impact Factor 2008: 2.596, 1/64 operations research & management science; 17/94 computer science, artificial intelligence; 33/229 engineering, electrical & electronic.

Global HR Forum 2009

logoGHRM

Just came back from a marvellous event called Global HR Forum 2009, held in Seoul, Republic of Korea (Nov 3 – Nov 5 2009) where I was invited to give a speech on the role of learning -oriented and innovative culture as a tool for managing change. I have to say that I was amazed by impecable organization and genuine warmth of our Korean hosts. In addition to this, the largest award for every speaker is to experience such a true eagerness to learn as I have from the large audience of Korean CEOs, HR professionals, policy makers and consultants. There were also a plethora of excellent talks from great practitioneers, scholars, consultants and global decision makers. Everybody is kindly invited to have a look at the Global HR Forum You Tube Channel, where all the talks will be made available in few weeks time.

Invited speech @ Global HR Forum 2009, Korea

I am honoured to announce my invited talk at the Global HR Forum 2009, November 3-5, Seoul, Korea.  This is the major South Korean HR conference, with expected 4,ooo decision-makers from global corporations, educational institutions and government. In prevoius years, it hosted renowed speakers such as Bill Clinton (Former President of USA), Lee Myung-Bak (President of the Republic of Korea), Bill Gates (Chairman  of Microsoft), Jack Welch (Former CEO, General Electric) … to name just a few of them. Indeed, a privilige, honour and great responsibility. My speech will be on The role of innovative and learning-oriented culture for managing organizational change. logo GHRF Korea 2009Here is the abstract:

General introduction:

Organizational change is a ubiquitous phenomenon in business environments. It is part of (human) nature and can be managed. Changes however differ in terms of amplitude, frequency, level, and scope at which they occur. Within the context of current economic downturn, managing high-amplitude, frequent, organizational changes is crucial for survival and future growth of practically any kind of organization. I argue that the most effective approach to manage omnipresent organizational changes is to develop a strong and adaptive organizational culture that values learning and innovation.

Theoretical background:

The array of available change management theories and models is wide and goes back to classical ‘unfreeze-change-freeze’ model (Lewin, 1951), ‘formula for changes’ (Beckhardt & Gleicher, 1969), famous model ‘8S’ (Koter, 1995), theory ‘E&O’ (Beer & Nohria, 2000), metaphorical and practical model of ‘wind, sailboat, captain & the crew’ and ‘orchestrating vs. improvising change’ (Kassarjian, 1997), and learning organization (Senge, 1990). Their common denominator is that they all seek the best way to adapt, respond, or maybe even to induce organizational changes. In doing so, most of the authors mentioned either directly or indirectly stresses the importance of appropriate set of values organizational members share. Recent empirical research shows that organizational learning culture (Škerlavaj et al., 2007) and innovative culture (Škerlavaj, Song, & Lee, In press) improve organizational performance of modern enterprises.

Practical impact, applications and expected outcomes:

Hence, if we know that organizational culture that values learning and innovation leads to improved organizational performance by better managing change, question for modern managers is how to develop and/or reinforce such culture. This session will: (1) show managers several examples of best practices in developing learning-oriented and innovative organizational cultures (contingent upon industry, size etc.); and (2) provide them with a toolbox of metaphors, stories, innovation contests, leadership approaches, row models, mottos, etc. in order to overcome resistance to change, introduce and reinforce innovative and learning-oriented set of values among organizational members.

Comparison of two learning networks published in JASIST

I am proud to announce yet another paper that was accepted for publication in top-notch journal: Pahor, M., Škerlavaj, M., Dimovski, V. (Forthcoming): Evidence Supporting the Network Perspective on Organizational Learning. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. Here is the abstract:

The paper provides evidence for the network perspective to organizational learning on the cases of two companies different in size, industry and culture. It builds on an earlier paper that introduced the network perspective to organizational learning and proposes some common traits of the learning networks and tests them with the help of the tools of social network analysis. We find support for the network perspective to organizational learning. There are some traits of the learning network that are common to very different companies, like the fact that learning occurs mainly in clusters. Some other traits depend much on the organizational culture. 

JASIST is an international, SCI ranked peer-reviewed journal (2006 IF 1.555) which serves as a forum for new research in information transfer and communication processes in general, and in the context of recorded knowledge in particular. Concerns include the generation, recording, distribution, storage, representation, retrieval, and dissemination of information, as well as its social impact and management of information agencies (JASIST, 2008).

Strategic alliances and organizational culture workshop

Edward ElgarI just came back from Maastricht, Nederlands, where UNU-MERIT (United Nations University & Maastricht Economic and social Research and training center on Innovation and Technology) and Eindhoven University of Technology organized a workshop on importance of organizational culture for success or failure of strategic alliances.

This was a preparatory step for Edward Elgar 2009 book co-edited by Jan Ulijn, Geert Duysters, and Elise Meijers. It will have many most informative cases from pan European, Dutch-Thai, Dutch-Indian, Slovenian-Serb, and Slovenian-Russian strategic alliances showing the importance of national, organizational, and professional cultures for development and management of strategic alliances. TU/e