jump to navigation

Perceived mastery climate, felt trust, and knowledge sharing December 1, 2017

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in journal article, knowledge sharing, mastery climate.
comments closed

We know how important trust is for oh-so-many reasons. How important is it to actually feel trusted? Our study reveals that felt trust plays an essential role for knowledge sharing behaviors. Summary below, while the article is available from the following link.

Interpersonal trust is associated with a range of adaptive outcomes, including knowledge sharing. However, to date, our knowledge of antecedents and consequences of employees feeling trusted by supervisors in organizations remains limited. On the basis of a multisource, multiwave field study among 956 employees from five Norwegian organizations, we examined the predictive roles of perceived mastery climate and employee felt trust for employees’ knowledge sharing. Drawing on the achievement goal theory, we develop and test a model to demonstrate that when employees perceive a mastery climate, they are more likely to feel trusted by their supervisors at both the individual and group levels. Moreover, the relationship between employees’ perceptions of a mastery climate and supervisor‐rated knowledge sharing is mediated by perceptions of being trusted by the supervisor. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of our findings are discussed.

Source: Nerstad, C.G.L., Searle, R., Černe, M., Dysvik, A., Škerlavaj, M., & Scherer, R. (2017): Perceived mastery climate, felt trust, and knowledge sharing, Journal of Organizational Behavior, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/job.2241/epdf.

Advertisements

Riding two Horses at Once: The Combined Roles of Mastery and Performance Climates in Implementing Creative Ideas November 22, 2017

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in creativity, innovation, journal article, mastery climate, performance climate.
comments closed

Innovation paradox is a reason behind much of trouble within and around innovation processes. What works on the front end of creative process, does not necessarily contribute to the innovation outcomes. Continuing our work that started with exploring role of perceived supervisor support and more extensive Capitalizing on creativity book project, we now present finding from Chinese and Slovenian employees on the role of motivational climates for innovation. Below you will find the abstract of our recent publication in the European Management Review:

Not all creative ideas end up being implemented. Drawing on micro-innovation literature and achievement goal theory, we propose that the interplay of two types of work motivational climates (mastery and performance) moderates a curvilinear relationship between the frequency of idea-generation and idea-implementation behavior. Field studies in two non-Western countries (China, with a study of 117 employees nested within 21 groups, and Slovenia, with a study of 240 employees nested within 34 groups) revealed a three-way interaction of idea generation, performance climate, and mastery climate as joint predictors of idea implementation. Specifically, results of random coefficient modeling show that when combined, mastery and performance climates transform the relationship between the frequency of idea generation and idea implementation from an inverse U-shaped curvilinear relationship to a positive and more linear one. These findings suggest that ideas are most frequently implemented in organizational contexts characterized by both high-mastery and high-performance climates. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Source: Škerlavaj, M., Černe, M., Dysvik, A., Nerstad, C. G. L., and Su, C. (2017): Riding two Horses at Once: The Combined Roles of Mastery and Performance Climates in Implementing Creative Ideas. European Management Review, doi: 10.1111/emre.12151.

 

System view on training and development for broadened impact November 1, 2017

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in book chapter, human resource management.
Tags: , ,
comments closed

What is the impact of training and development activities at work? In the chapter (Dysvik, Carlsen, & Skerlavaj, 2017) published recently in Cambridge handbook of workplace training and employee development, we investigate how training can contribute to development of systems thinking of trainees as seen through three lenses of building impact: the realm of business impact, the realm of beneficiary impact, and the realm of societal impact. Knowledge creation is socially constructed through the development of shared meaning between employees participating in training, their trainers, and their respective colleagues and beneficiaries during and after training program completion. In short, training should be aligned and integrated with the core drivers for organizational performance, and provide employees with a holistic and systemic understanding to act autonomously and proactively in applying relevant training content when deemed relevant.

Source: Dysvik, A., Carlsen, A., Skerlavaj, M. (2017): Rings of fire: Training for systems thinking and broadened impact. In: Brown, K. G. (Ed.): The Cambridge Handbook of Workplace Training and Employee Development. Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9781316091067: p. 471-494.

MKWCI TV 3 October 17, 2017

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in innovation.
comments closed

Third season of student creativity at its best! Twelve spectacular videos created by BI Norwegian business School master of science students at the course Managing knowledge work, creativity and innovation. Everything from culture for innovation, learning from failures, social entrepreneurship, innovative working methods, gamification to innovations in business models in private and public organizations. Red thread this years seems to be crossing boundaries to find meaning and dealing with societal megatrends. Enjoy the show!

Cultural intelligence, knowledge hiding, & individual and team creativity August 28, 2017

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in cultural intelligence, experiment, field study, innovation, knowledge hiding, team.
comments closed

Working across cultures is a thing of past, present, and hopefully also future. The question is now what contributes to good knowledge and innovation processes in such context. Sabina Bogilovic, Matej Cerne and Miha Skerlavaj in their article Hiding behind the mask? published in latest European journal of Work and Organizational Psychology argue that it is the cultural intelligence that enables both individuals and their teams to overcome social categorization, decrease knowledge hiding and improve creative outcomes.

Culturally diverse colleagues can be valuable sources for stimulating creativity at work, yet only if they decide to share their knowledge. Drawing on the social exchange theory, we propose that cross-cultural interactions among individuals from different national backgrounds can act as a salient contingency in the relationship between knowledge hiding and creativity (individual and team). We further suggest, based on the social categorization theory (e.g., the categorization process of “us” against “them” based on national differences), that cultural intelligence enhances the likelihood of high-quality social exchanges between culturally diverse individuals and, therefore, remedies the otherwise negative relationship between individual knowledge hiding and individual creativity. Two studies using field and experimental data offer consistent support for this argument. First, a field study of 621 employees nested among 70 teams revealed that individual knowledge hiding is negatively related to individual creativity and that cultural intelligence moderates the relationship between knowledge hiding and creativity at an individual level. A quasi-experimental study of 104 international students nested in 24 teams replicated and extended these findings by implying that individual knowledge hiding is also negatively related to team creativity. We discuss the implications for practice and future research.

Relational leadership and creativity August 21, 2017

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in creativity, leadership, relations at work.
Tags: , , ,
comments closed

What kind of leader-employee relationships matter most in terms of creativity? This is the question Stine Therese S. Berg (OSM Aviation Management), Arnhild Grimstad (Google Ireland), Miha Škerlavaj (BI Norwegian Business School), and Matej Černe (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia) asked ourselves in the most recent publication from European Management Journal with the title Social and economic leader-member exchange and employee creative behavior: The role of employee willingness to take risks and emotional carrying capacity .

Here is the abstract:

In the current study we explore the relational aspect of leadership for stimulating employee creative behavior. Drawing on leader-member exchange (LMX) theory, we propose that the association between two distinct types of leader-member exchange relationships (social [SLMX] and economic [ELMX]) and creative behavior is mediated by employee willingness to take risks and moderated by emotional carrying capacity. Based on two-wave data from a sample of 147 employees, we surprisingly find only marginal support for the association between SLMX and creative behavior, and, as expected, we find no support for the association between ELMX and creative behavior. We do find evidence of the full mediation of willingness to take risks in these two associations. Furthermore, we also find a positively significant interaction of SLMX with emotional carrying capacity (ECC), but no support for the interaction of ELMX with ECC in predicting employee creative behavior. We contribute to a deeper view of understanding the leadership of employee creativity as a relational process, contingent upon both employee characteristics as well as the nature of leader-member exchange.

HRMJ – knowledge hiding and innovative work behavior April 7, 2017

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in innovation, job design, knowledge hiding.
comments closed

In our recent study published at the Human Resource Management Journal and special issue on HRM and innovation, we show that job design (task interdependence and autonomy) and mastery climates can reduce the negative association between knowledge hiding and innovative work behavior.

This study investigates the multilevel interplay among team-level, job-related, and individual characteristics in stimulating employees innovative work behavior (IWB) based on the theoretical frameworks of achievement goal theory (AGT) and job characteristics theory (JCT). A multilevel two-source study of 240 employees and their 34 direct supervisors in two medium-sized Slovenian companies revealed significant two- and threeway interactions, where a mastery climate, task interdependence, and decision autonomy moderated the relationship between knowledge hiding and IWB. When employees hide knowledge, a team mastery climate only facilitates high levels of IWB if accompanied by either high task interdependence or high decision autonomy. In the absence of one of these job characteristics, knowledge hiding prevents higher levels of IWB
even in the case of strong team mastery climate. The results suggest that multiple job design antecedents are necessary to neutralize the negative influence of knowledge hiding on micro-innovation processes within organizations.

Journal of Organizational Behavior – Special Issue on knowledge hiding December 8, 2016

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in knowledge hiding.
Tags: ,
add a comment

jobTo all the researchers interested in better understanding of knowledge hiding, here is the link to the special issue of Journal of Organizational Behavior. Guest editors Catherine Connelly, Anders Dysvik, Miha Skerlavaj, and Matej Cerne are interested in both quantitative and qualitative work that advances the field. Submission deadline December 1st, 2017. Welcome!

MKWCI TV2: Student creativity at its best! November 17, 2016

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in change management, innovation, prosocial motivation, relations at work.
comments closed

mkwci-tv2-logoMSc students at BI Norwegian Business School have been working hard over the semester at our course Managing knowledge work, creativity and innovation to come up with 13 innovation stories under the umbrella of MKWCI TV2. These are stories about success, growth and scaling-up, they are also stories about learning from failure. Narratives about technological, process and service innovations, about innovation process, change agency, prosocial motivation, startup cultures, challenges of scaling up, as well as about the innovation outcome itself. Video testimonials come from private and public sector, from healthcare and social care, shipping, transport, green economy, municipalities, IT sector, sports, dealing with technological distractions and behavioral change through gamification, and shared economy. Lessons learnt? Good innovation stories are all around! And it is remarkably engaging to learn about them as innovation journalists. Enjoy the show!

Virtual Special Issue: Good organization in Management Learning September 29, 2016

Posted by Miha Škerlavaj in learning organization, prosocial motivation.
comments closed

management_learningWhat is good organization and how do we pursue it as practitioners, students and scholars of organizations? That is the theme for this virtual special issue in Management Learning. Good organization is a theme of perennial relevance; a topic defined more by the ethical vitality of how we entertain a set of open-ended and contested questions than a body of knowledge with final answers. Recently this set of questions have moved from issues of excellence and innovation to matters of corporate social responsibility and sustainability, and from there to renewed interest in prosocial motivation, giving behavior at work and to compassion and care as burgeoning research fields of their own.

To read the full introduction, please click here.

– Arne Carlsen, Miha Skerlavaj and Anders Dysvik

%d bloggers like this: